Category Archives: Literary News

FREE “Roanoke Valley Reads Book” for VWCC Students

Factory Man

Students — Get a FREE copy of the 2015 Roanoke Valley Reads book, Factory Man! How?

  • Come to the top floor of Brown Library with your student ID or class schedule on Wednesday, October 14th
  • Ask for the book, Factory Man
  • If you’re one of the first 60 people to ask, you’ll get your own copy of the book for free!

Want to get it signed by the author, former Roanoke Times reporter, Beth Macy? Head to her Kickoff talk at the Jefferson Center later that evening on October 14th at 7pm. The “Factory Man” himself, John Bassett, III, will be joining her, and she will be greeting people and signing books after the event.

Brown Library and Student Activities have partnered once again to hold a book giveaway of the featured Roanoke Valley Reads selection. Roanoke Valley Reads is a community-wide reading experience that brings people together, promotes tolerance and understanding of differing points of view, and emphasizes the importance of literacy.

Local Book Featured in People Magazine

Mister Owita’s Guide to Gardening by local author, Carol Wall, is featured in the “Books” review section of the March 10th issue of People Magazine. The review calls the book “a profoundly moving memoir that tells the story of an unexpected friendship and the rewards of reaping what we sow.

Two copies of this popular new book are available on the top floor of Brown Library. See a library staff member at the Circulation Desk, and check out this featured selection for a 2 week period.

Come to Brown Library and “Get your READ on!”

Popular Local Book on Reserve at Brown Library

Brown Library has two copies of the popular new book, Mister Owita’s Guide to Gardening: How I Learned the Unexpected Joy of a Green Thumb and an Open Heart by local author and retired Roanoke Catholic English teacher, Carol Wall. The book, recently featured in the Roanoke Times, tells the story of Wall’s unlikely friendship with Kenyan immigrant, Giles Owita, who has a Doctorate in Horticulture from Virginia Tech. Go to the Circulation Desk on the top floor of Brown Library to check out this book for two weeks.

The library also has a large collection of beautiful and informative horticulture and gardening resources to support the college’s Horticulture programs and to appeal to gardening enthusiasts. Just a few of the available titles are listed below:

Books in Print

  • Flora of Virginia by Alan S. Weakley, J. Christopher Ludwig, and John F. Townsend
  • The Nature-Friendly Garden: Creating a Backyard Haven for Plants, Wildlife, and People by Marlene A. Condon
  • Flowers A to Z: Buying, Growing, Cutting, Arranging by Cecelia Heffernan
  • Sustainable Horticulture: Today and Tomorrow by Raymond P. Poincelot

Audiobooks

  • The Botany of Desire: A Plant’s-Eye View of the World by Michael Pollan
  • Farm City: The Education of an Urban Farmer by Novella Carpenter

Magazines and Journals in Print

  • Fine Gardening
  • Garden Design
  • Horticulture: Magazine of American Gardening
  • Mother Earth News: The Original Guide to Living Wisely

Come to Brown Library and “Get your READ on!”

New Shakespeare Portraits Found? A Tale of Two Sources.

Shakespeare 2

Courtesy flickr user Drew Maughan – Creative Commons -Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic

We love it when an announcement is made that a new portrait of Shakespeare is discovered. These stories are popular because everyone wants to see what the author of “Hamlet” and “Romeo and Juliet” looked like. The problem is that there is no definitive portrait out there. Every portrait must endure incredible scrutiny from scientists and scholars and, no matter the results, the experts will fall into one of three camps: yes, no, and maybe.

Compare two stories about recent discoveries of Shakespeare portraits. One is from Discovery News titled “Two New Portraits of Shakespeare Found” by Rozella Lorenzi, posted 12 February 2014. It’s the online news arm of the television folks who bring you Animal Planet and the Discovery Channel. Think about these questions based on the short article. Are there other portraits with competing claims of authenticity? The one scholar mentioned in the article is in the yes camp. Are there others who are in the “no” or “maybe” camp? Is it possible these portraits are not authentic? Who is the author?

A second article is from Science Daily, titled “Lifetime Portrait of Shakespeare Discovered?” based on material from the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, posted March 10, 2009. Think about these two articles. What differences do you notice in how the information is presented? See Science Daily’s About Section on the page (scroll to the bottom). Which is a more reliable source of information: Science Daily or Discovery News?

Both articles make for interesting reading for the general public. But, as a college student, you have to carefully consider the sources you use in your work and don’t be afraid to question what you read.